About your Search

20110701
20110731
SHOW
Book TV 39
( more )
STATION
CNNW 65
CSPAN2 58
CSPAN 51
CNN 49
FOXNEWS 41
KQED (PBS) 39
WHUT (Howard University Television) 38
WETA 23
KRCB (PBS) 20
WMPT (PBS) 19
MSNBC 16
KTVU (FOX) 12
KQEH (PBS) 9
KCSM (PBS) 8
MSNBCW 8
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 523
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 523 (some duplicates have been removed)
transformed the arab world. in egypt, the demonstrations continue, despite hosni mubarak's removal, and all eyes are on election scheduled for september. dozens of parties have been formed, including one link to the muslim brotherhood. banned under mubarak, years of charitable work have given it a head start. >> the patients at the islamic medical association hospital made before, but the care they receive is anything but. with help averaging just 3% of the national budget, state hospitals are underfunded and poorly staffed. >> we are very well received here. the doctors do not just ask us to be quick and leave like they do in public hospitals. >> imagine british consultants offering their services for 1/10 of what they could get in private clinics. that is with some of the doctors here are doing. >> we have to support them. no. perhaps people might come here and say that the moslem brotherhood is doing a good thing, so they will vote for them. >> this is a hospital. we're dealing with medical problems. not political. >> the islamic medical association was set up in 1977. that is a lot of p
are perhaps all of you walking through, say, a day in the life of a coptic christian in egypt. get kind of granular and tell me just how it's different from what it should be, just how the persecution, the atmosphere, the discrimination in society presents itself. when you go out industry in the morning. what is different from what it should be when you go to register for a drivers license? when you, say, go to a restaurant? give me a picture about daily life, the daily things we would go through. get granular here. you know, what is different question might also address was different since the revolution, going downhill since then. >> sure. i fisa been speaking with a lot of people who have been fleeing egypt. i meet a lot of people are not interested in emigrating to the united states because they describe a situation which is completely intolerable. a day in the life, they hate speech, let's start with that. the microphones that are attached to the mosques, the sermons are filled with hate. and i've heard from several different clients throughout different parts of egypt this new com
the bible, thoord deny the facts on the ground, julie news, tel es-safi, israel. >>> egypt christians fighting for the future of their country. how they are teaming up with unlikely allies to help secure their freedom. >> protesters in egypt are calling for change. >> some believe the revolution is being hijacked by islamist. gary lane reports, country's coptic christians are joining the political fight from keep thatting from happening. >> another massive summertime protest in the square. this 1 after hosni mubarak. >> it is good news to go to the streets again. to protect the revolutions, muslim brotherhood hijacked the revolution. >> they are moving towards an islamic state. that is the belief of coptic spokesman magdy khalil and many other egyptians believe there is a political deal with the muslim brotherhood. >> they are looking to protect, their position, who can accept this situation. muslim brotherhood? muslim brotherhood won't look for plan to control whole egypt. >> magdy khalil says the brother hood is exchanging power and control. originally elections planned for septembe
tried in jordan, and the pyramids in egypt. do not go away. >> "this is america" is made possible by the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. the american federation of teachers, a union of professionals. the singapore tourism board. there is something for everyone. singapore airlines. a great way to fly. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the rotondaro family trust. the ctc foundation. afo communications. and the american life tv network. >> one of the most important sites in cyprus is the color of st. paul -- pillar of st. paul. the bible says paul was tied to this bill and was whipped 40 to christianity. this location represents the first location of christianity in europe. before visiting the pillar of st. paul, i spoke with the archbishop to understand the importance of st. paul's visit to cyprus. >> what do we know about st. paul and cyprus? >> this is the first church founded by saint paul in 45 a.d. when he came, he was not an apostle. he became an apostle. with his speech, his first miracle,
journal," a discussion on more is happening in egypt and the middle east. this is about 39 minutes. now, samer shehata, georgetown university assistant professor on arab politics. professor, what is the latest on egypt? guest: president mubarak was ousted on february 11, so this is a transition period. we have the supreme council of the armed forces. it is headed by the military in the have put in an interim cabinet. they have called for parliamentary elections in september. but the country is certainly unsettled. there is a great deal of political activity with different political parties forming, alliance is made, security issues. security is not fully back to what it was. there has not been reform within the security apparatus. the economy is faltering. so the transitional moment isn't settled. host: talk about the elections that you mentioned. in the last decades, we sought elections in which mr. mumbai won. what is different in terms of the process and the way that this might be played out? guest: as you know the january 25 revolution was against this authoritarianism and electoral
. and iraq already, the 1 million christians, only three to 400,000 are left. will this have into egypt? after the church bombing in the 2011 years following the above being, president -- french president denounced the religious extermination plan to these christians. he mentioned that grand will not deliver it such a plan. on march 5th, after the revolution, the member parliament, former minister was invited as a guest speaker and egypt's revolution. the son of armenian parents who ran away from the turkish genocide with the context of the euphoric turkish revolution in 1908, seeking freedom, democracy was euphoric as jason nietzsche today. there is a country away from religious power. only seven years later, in 1915, around 1.15 million were exterminated if you wish to us that because that today's media, because today's fast communication, this would prevent such a scenario to egypt. what is international community? the u.s. or international human rights investigation commission is absolutely necessary to examine the events freely. i know that in the european parliament the idea is go
>>reporter: this week on world business... >>egypt after the revolution - we look at the state of the country 6 months on. >>the government so far has not presented a single economic policy of any kind. they have not provided a stimulus package for the most poorest population because they are the most effected. >>reporter: why hydroelectric power is a big draw for energy intensive industries around the world. >>things like the smelting of aluminium of bauxite you're going to need huge quantities of power andfor that hydropower does seem to be the obvious solution >>reporter: and how social media can be an amazing source of market research, if companies can sort through the vast amounts of consumer comments posted online. >>the scale of data mining is increasing all the time. the cost of, the unit cost of data mining is going down all the time. >>reporter: hello and welcome. i'm raya abirached and this is world business, your weekly insight into the global business trends shaping our lives. at the start of the year egypt surprised the world,by overthrowing the regime of presiden
of the ousted president and his former interior administer. -- interior minister. we will get an update on egypt cozy political transition next on c-span. president obama followed by house speaker john boehner on the deficit reduction talks. >> watch multimedia clips from on the justices. "the supreme court" available wherever e-books are sold. >> now discussion on egypt's political transition. a military council has been running the country. said elassar will talk about what is ahead for the country. from the u.s. institute of peace, this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> i am tara sonenshine, executive vice president of the u.s. institute of peace, and we welcome you to this hopefully permanent headquarters. i also want to briefly welcome -- and i will tell you more about -- the two gentleman you see in front of you today. i welcome first our guest major- general said elassar and the moderator of today's program william quandt, and i will tell you about their biographies in just a moment. let me set a few house rules. cellphones off. pagers, anything else that makes strange sounds, please turn th
's decision to place american military forces on high alert, condemned the attacks on egypt and alternately lead to a cease-fire announced on election day, november 6th, 1956. it's about an hour. >> good evening. welcome to the atlanta history center. i'm sal cilella. this is another livingston lecture, which is made possible through a dead generous support of the livingston foundation of atlanta, and we are ever so grateful to them to do their support our next lecture will be held may 16th and will feature james b. stewart, author of tangled webs, how false statements are undermining america from martha stewart to bernie madoff. i have seen some of the previews of this book, and you would be well advised to be here. it's fascinating. also, join us for a lecture featuring the best selling author of double in the white city, eric larsen. he will be discussing his new book, in the garden of peace, love, terror, and an american family in hitler's berlin. tonight's lecture is being recorded by c-span. check your local listings for the broadcast day. you can see it again. at this time of what li
the economic problems of egypt and tunisia. they are really incredibly complicated and raised serious issues about sustaining democratic transition. in the case of egypt, in both cases tourism is very important and tourism has gone way down. but what others may particularly in egypt is that a lot of the old kind of arab socialist statist tendencies are coming back, reasserting themselves and they want to stop the privatization of state companies. they are pressing for higher salaries. it is going to be harder to do business in that country. it is probably going to be a year before we even know if they have gone through the process of choosing a new parliament and the president. it will probably be at least until early next year before we even know who the president and what the relationship between the presidency and the parliament is going to be let alone with the economic policy is of the new egypt. but whoever is in power there going to be under a lot of pressure from labor unions that are demanding higher salaries. they have almost doubled the minimum salary in the country in the last mo
. in the new constitution, the new parliament which would be elected from all of the people of egypt, we will see if they can change so they have the right to change. >> you decided on no international monitors. >> we are dealing now with the election laws. you cannot respond never. many opinions are in the direction and we tried to respond on some. all the parties and groups have had a chance to respond. >> yes. and we are worried if there is an objection from the court of the constitution, it would make great problems, because this parliament will issue the constitution. and the president would be elected through their laws. it would be a great problem for the country. to have objections from the constitutional court. and for monitors, we are ready to receive any monitoring from egypt, and also the far end visitors can visit egypt, but not on the basis of monitoring or observing or something like that. let's move on to get to a couple more topics before you open it up more broadly. during the revolution one of the slogans heard frequently is that the people in the army were one hand. t
dump. a egypt's revolution at crossroads. protesters accusing the authorities. it started six months ago in tunisia. a special report on the countries that led the arab spring. >> it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 2:00 in the afternoon in cyprus, where a series of explosions have tore through a naval base, killing at least 12 and injuring dozens more. it happened at a munitions storage in the fishing village of zygi. it was felt as far as 3 miles away. >> nothing could have prepared local people for this. a hot summer morning was shattered when a munitions storage pact with gunpowder exploded. it ripped through the national guard naval base, killing those unlucky enough to be in its path. homes and cars nearby were seriously damaged. >> the sound -- it blew my socks off. windows, door frames. things left their shelves. a total mess inside. >> officials are speculating this was a tragic accident. the fire brigade has been called out to fight a wildfire. there were massive explosions from the naval base. the weapons cache had been confiscated over two years ago from
military forces on high alert, condemned the attacks on egypt at the united nations and ultimately led to a ceasefire announced on election day november 6, 1956. it's out and our. >> design. welcome to the atlanta history center. i'm the president and ceo of the history center. this is another livingston letcher which is made possible through the generous support of the livingston foundation, and we are ever so grateful to them for their continued support. our next lecture will be held may 16th and will feature james b. stewart come author of tangled webs, how false statements are undermining america from martha stewart to bernie madoff. i've seen some of the previews of this book, and you would be well edify is to be here. it's fascinating. also joining us for the featuring best-selling author of deval in the white city eric larsen who will be here. who will be discussing his new book in the garden of peace, love, terror and american family in hitler's berlin. tonight's lecture is being recorded by c-span and check your local listings for the broadcast state you can see it again. at t
the attacks on egypt at the united nations, and ultimately led to a cease-fire announced on election day, november 6, 1956. it's about an hour. >> good evening. welcome to the atlanta history center. i am the president and ceo of the history center. this is another livingston lecture which is made possible through the generous support of the livingston foundation atlanta. we are ever so grateful to them for their continued support. our next living lecture we held may 16 and will feature james stewart, author of tangled webs, false statements are undermining america from martha stewart to bernie madoff. i've seen some of the previous of this book, and you would be well advised to be here. it's fascinating. also in may choice for a lecture featuring the best selling author of devil in the white city, erik larsen, who will be here. he would be discussing his new book in the garden of beef, love, care and american family and hitler's berlin. tonight's lecture is being recorded by c-span, and check your local listings for the broadcast date you can see it again. at this time out like to ask y
carbon economic growth to low carbon economic growth. >>reporter: tourism in egypt brings in billions and is a vital part of its economy, but the industryhas taken a serious knock in the wake of the arab spring. >>we started back in february being eighty per cent below the number of tourists of february last year. >>reporter: mp3s revolutionised the music world, but will video on demand do the same for home entertainment >>it enables people to deliver new services and new ways of watching that suit the modern lifestyle. >>reporter: hello and welcome. i'm raya abirached and this is world business, your weekly insight into the global business trends shaping our lives. for manufacturers in china, 2011 marks another yearof power cuts. one of the factors behind this is a rebound in the production of polluting and high energy industries. new policies to radically clean up will be unveiled in the autumn, which will have far reaching implications for companies doing business in china. >>reporter: for manufacturers, few things are as frustrating as a lack of power - no matter what thecause. >>
advocates about the plight of christians in egypt in the wake of the political uprising this year. that talk with hosni mubarak's presidency. christians account for an estimated ten to 20% of egypt's population. this hearing, chaired by new jersey congressman christopher smith, is two hours and 45 minutes. >> the commission will come to order, and i want to welcome our very distinguished panel to this commission. focussing on a minority at risk christians in egypt. and just for the c-span audience, i would point out that the helsinki commission was formed immediately after the signing of the helsinki final act in the mid 1970's. a comprehensive human-rights convention that had three majors dealing with security, another with trade, and the one we that we have emphasized very strongly over these last several decades has been the human rights basket. the helsinki commission is made up of nine house members, nine members of the senate and three members of the department of state all assistant secretaries, very high level including the human rights assistant secretary for democracy, labor and hu
brotherhood, who is ascendent now in egypt and who may very well gain control in that country in the 1950s, '60s, the egyptian government, where the brotherhood was found, egypt, crackdown killed several brotherhood leaders, arrested them, executed them. some of the leading men moved to the saudis and from there brotherhood operatives with saudi petrodollars spread out across europe, across america, the mosques were built. the enclaves were created so while the brotherhood and the saudis don't see eye-to-eye on some things without a doubt, they have worked closely in the islamization of the west. >> host: and does that mean that their goal is the complete islamization of the west, whether we're talking about europe or the united states? in other words, they want -- and i don't want to put words in your mouth here. but in the book you indicate that the goal is nothing less than putting the united states or for that matter in the western world which is shari'a law which is antithetical to the way we live our lives. >> guest: not just the west, china, japan. the endgame for islamists, they th
at the potential for investment in south sudan. an uncertain future in egypt despite concessions from the prime minister. it was announced he'll reshovel his cabinet and call for trials of former officials accused of killing protesters to be open to the public. but some say that's not good enough. demonstrators have a list of demands for the government from putting the accused officers on trial to ending the country's military rule. the former u.n. nuclear chief is now a presidential candidate in egypt and he believes that there is just cause for the ongoing protests. >> i think they have absolute right to feel frustrated and let down. things are going very slow. justice is being delayed. security is not back in force. all the olded apparatus of the minister of interior are still in place. there is no clear road map as how we're going to cross the transition to a free and fair election. so there's a lot of frustration, a lot of angst, a lot of divisiveness. so it's a bit messy. >> what would you do specifically that the military is not doing right now? in fairness, they've had their hands very
it in egypt. what happens in egypt does not stay in egypt. then you have a movement, because every walking, living, breathing arab in the arab world today feels everyone of those things. everyone of these regimes is dead man walking. i don't know when or how. >> to get more domestic, you said that the decade beginning on september 11, 2011, was the worst decade in american history. my first reaction was, where were you during the 1860's? lincoln was doing all land grant policies, trying to build the transcontinental railroad, all during the war. >> we argued about for great problems. the next chapter is called ignoring our history. does what he said, walter. i would argue, we are not supposed to say this, so do not let it out of this room. we actually have an industrial policy in this country, a formula for success. as much as some of you might think that you did this all by yourself, whatever will you build, whatever business you start, not in it off, okay? -- not get off, ok? -- knock it off, ok? you built this as a result of the greatest public-private partnership in the history of the
linked, do you think, to the global food crisis? >>now when you look at egypt and tunisia and some of the other countries; the first thing you see isdictators that overstayed their welcome because they've been there for decades, that's the first thing to say. but it's also true that high food prices this year for food importing countries like egypt, the largest single wheat importer in the world, egypt, was certainly part of the tinder which led to a lot of this unrest. and though egypt through its social policies kept some bread prices down,other pasta prices and wheat based products definitely saw rising prices, rising tension, rising social insecurity and social instability. this is a phenomenon that is going to roil the world unless we get ahead of it. and for those who believe that military approaches...whether in libya, or afghanistan, or iraq, or not so secret 'secret' war in yemen, somehow can solve this problem; they are making a serious mistake. all the war in the world is only going to exacerbate this hunger crisis. of course what we need is farmers that in a stable envi
. yohave written that egypt is now more important than afghanista yohave been recently there talking to people and have expressed some conce about what follows. where are we with respect to the arab spring, with the focus on egypt? >> well, i think the first thing that you really see when you cover this, charlie, is roger and i have had, it's really been a privilege to do. one of the most remarkable new stories i have ever covered is that it is arab springs. even one of these countries is really on a different trajectory. so let's talk about what roger identifies as the most important, and i would agree is certainly egypt. you know, it is still in a very fragile state. they have scheduled parliamentary elections for september. that first parliament will then write a constitution. that constitution will lay the basis for presidential election. and that is all, i think to the good. the problem is, you know, there's two things that you need to be successful. one is that you have to have real parties and real parties have to have real leaderand right now since we were all there, tell me
nor forward-leaning. just as the people of egypt, tunisia, libya, syria, and elsewhere see a chance for a better life of genuine freedom, the leaders of radical islam see a chance to rise political turmoil into power. the united states has a vital stake in the future of this region. we have been presented with a challenge as great as any we face in recent decades. and we must get it right. the question is -- are we up to the challenge? my answer is of course we are. if we're clear about our interests and guided by our principles, we can help steer events in the right direction. our nation has done this in the past. at the end of world war ii, in the last decade of the cold war, in the most recent war on terror and we can do it again. but president obama has failed to formulate and carry out an effective and coherent strategy in response to these events. he has been timid, slow, and too often without a clear understanding of our interests. our clear commitment to our principles and parts of the republican party now seem to be trying to outbid the democrats in appealing to isolationis
cairo egypt. i was there in the final moments of the 18 day revolution that brought down the regime of hosni mubarak. in that time, egyptians spoke to me about breaking down barriers of fear and sectianism. >> it wajust this moment ere you i realized that basicay clearly the barrier of fear that has been there for so long was broken. and i think this is one of the most significa outcomes of what we've seen happen so far regardls of, you know, how the political situation develops. this is one thing. the second moment was when mubarak made his first speech addreing the protest that had been going on. and he was a ten minute speech. he made almost no concessions at all. hardly addressed what was going on in the streets and the demands of the people. but the interesting part was how, i was outside on the 6th of october bridge, the demonstrators were still out there. and everybody went quiet. they went to the cars, turned up the radios. and tuned in, listened to every single word of the speech. and right after started to chant that you know down, down with mubarak. it was interesting bec
to the muslim brotherhood. does that mean they're not terrorists anymore? >>> is egypt headed for -- and a distinguished american writer with a pulitzer prize. just one catch. he's not an american. jose antonio vargas doesn't even have a green card. america at its best or its worst. then, seven seconds. >> we're in the seven-second delay today? >> in television if you say something wrong, a seven-second delay can save you. >> i thought he was kind of a [ bleep ] yesterday. >> not this time. and then there were none from obama's original team of economic advisers. only treasury secretary tim geithner remained and word has just come in that geithner is weighing leaving office after the debt ceiling crisis is resolved. he talked about it today at the clinton global initiative in chicago. >> i live for this work. it's the only thing i've ever done. i believe in it. i'm going to be doing it for the foreseeable future. people are interested because, you know, i have a family and my son is going back to new york to finish high school and i'm going to be commuting for a while. i'm goi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 523 (some duplicates have been removed)